Construction World - February 2002 Issue
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Cover Story

The power sector is creating tremendous opportunities for project developers, equipment vendors and contractors, says Chandragupta Amritkar. 

  Power, probably the single most important element in any nation’s economy, is today attracting maximum interest in our country, as the sector accounts for a third of the total project investments of Rs.16.85 trillion envisaged in India.

 

It is estimated that the installed capacity of the government and IPP power plants in India today is 101,660 MW. In order to sustain a six per cent GDP growth, an addition of around 10,000 MW per annum is necessary. All this means there is a huge market for equipment vendors as well as construction companies. With a view of such a big investment opportunity Construction World provides a report on the power industry, its status and the ongoing and expected projects.

 

Although electric power generation in India on a commercial basis is almost a century old, substantial power development efforts began only after independence. At the launch of the First Five-Year plan in 1951, power generation was recognised as a major input for the country’s economic development and was accorded high priority. The power sector outlays have been among the highest in successive Five-Year Plans ever since. The first two Plans focused on hydropower (as component of multi-purpose projects). Subsequent plans emphasised on rapid installations of thermal power stations.

 

As a result of plan efforts, India’s installed power generation capacity grew to 16,664 MW in 1974. However, assessment of the planned growth since 1951 indicated that with the uneven distribution of resources, power development with only states as spatial units, would result in large inter-state imbalances. This, and the need for quicker and greater capacity addition, led the government of India to assume a leading role in large scale power generation as a matter of policy and, through an amendment of the Electricity (Supply) Act, the National Thermal Power Corporation Ltd. (NTPC) and National Hydroelectric Power Corporation Ltd. (NHPC) were set up in the central sector to supplement the efforts of the states.

 

Consequently, total installed capacity of power utilities has increased from 1,362 MW in 1947 to 101,660 MW in March 2001. Electricity generation, which was only about 4.1 billion units in 1947, has risen to 499 billion units in 2000-01.

 

Electricity till recently had been the sole property, initially of the Central Government and later the State Government were also included. Today, the Ministry of Power and Central Electricity Authority are responsible for the broad policy for development of power and coordination of related activities and allocation of national resources. The implementation of these programmes, distribution and supply are left to the states.

 

Over the years, the gap between demand and supply of power widened and an important meeting was held between the chief ministers in 1996 to discuss and deliberate upon the issues pertaining to the power sector. It was decided that the future expansion and improvement of power sector cannot be fully achieved through public resources alone and it is essential to encourage private sector participation in generation, transmission and distribution. It was also decided that each state/union territory should set up an independent State Electricity Regulatory Commission (SERC).

 

In recent years, central public sector units, the state electricity boards and the private sector all have been undertaking power generation. Foreign investments up to 100 per cent are also allowed with repatriation of profit to facilitate foreign companies to enter. Although the options are attractive, the private sector has had marginal contribution.

 

To give a fair idea as on March 2001, the total installed capacity of utilities stood at 101,660 MW. Most of this installed capacity is under government control. The state governments control nearly 60 per cent of the power generating capacity. Currently, the central government owns about 30 per cent of the power generating capacity in the country, the majority of which is in the thermal sector. Of the total installed thermal capacity of 25,366.50 MW in central sector, NTPC’s share is 19,435 MW (76.61 per cent).

 

The power markets operating in different parts of the world can be broadly classified into four basic generic structures – Monopoly model; Single-buyer model; Third-party or open-access model and Power pool (wholesale market or spot market) model. Now in India, the state power utilities have not been operating on commercial lines resulting in less revenue or loss. Also the Indian power sector has been going through a period of severe power shortages (both in terms of peaking power and energy) for several years and as such there is very little redundancy in generation and transmission facilities.

 

Most states are now proposing unbundling of generation, transmission, and distribution functions as part of the reform programme. In fact, a few states have already un-bundled generation activity from the others. Load dispatch function is assigned to the transmission entity.

 

Servicing end consumers is the responsibility of the states and the distribution and transmission are done through the state electricity boards (SEB). SEBs is required to coordinate with the power generating companies. A few private companies have also been given the licence for distribution. The regional transmission networks of the SEBs and the Power Grid Corporation of India are the main distribution and transmission links.

 

The SEBs are estimated to be losing around Rs. 20,000 crore annually and these losses are being funded through debts from the states. With the plight of the state finances being bad, neither the states nor the SEBs are currently in a position to make further investments. The private sector, which jumped into the fray after the sector was opened up, soon realised that money in this sector was not as easy as selling licenses to the next buyer and making profit. Actual plants had to be set up and operated at competitive rates. Initial padding-up of capital costs, dollar indexation and browbeating the state utilities to buy at pre-determined rates did not help.

 

Keeping this in view the govt. has taken rapid steps. The Electricity Bill 2001 has also been introduced in Parliament. The bill aims to pave the way for the preparation of a national policy, de-licensing generation and captive power, opening up the transmission sector and providing for license free generation and distribution in the rural areas. Besides making metering mandatory it also sets up a framework for resolving vexatious issues relating to those between the electricity regulatory bodies and generators.

 

It has been stated in Parliament that 7,420 MW of thermal generation capacity is likely to be added during the 10th Plan period (2002-07). Of this, a preponderant 5,440 MW would be in the form of coal-based plants. Gas-based plants would involve a capacity of 1,861 MW, while liquid fuel plants would have a capacity of 119 MW. Presently, India’s total capacity of thermal power plants is around 75,000 MW, out of the one lakh MW of total power generating capacity.

 

With all this in the pipeline the construction industry can look forward to good earnings from the power sector.

 

 

Important government decisions:

Corporatisation

State and union territories will endeavour to take steps to corporatise and commercialise generating companies, transmission companies and distribution companies so that they are able to operate on commercial principles, generate the required resources and ensure availability of reasonably priced power to the common man.

 

Distribution reforms

In view of the urgent need to reduce transmission and distribution losses, facilitate higher investments in system improvement and ensure availability of reliable power to the consumers, reform of the distribution sector will be initiated by establishing distribution companies in different regions of each state. The entry of private investors will be encouraged wherever feasible. To begin with, at least 25 per cent of the state will be taken up for distribution reform. The whole state will be covered in four years.

 

Mega projects

To take advantage of the benefits of mega projects, each state/union territory will take steps to facilitate setting up of mega projects in accordance with the guidelines issued by the Govt. of India.

 

Commercial arrangements for payment for power

Having regard to the large investments required to be undertaken by CPSUs for generation and transmission projects, state/union territories will adopt commercial arrangements such as opening of LCs of the required amount for payment of power from generating and transmission agencies and for prompt settlement of dues.

 

Securitisation

To enable CPSUs to take up new projects for generation and transmission and in accordance with the Government of India policy of securitisation of the outstanding debts of Central Public Sector Undertakings. State Governments will take steps to facilitate orderly securitisation of such debts.

 

Hydel projects

Recognising the need for expeditious development of hydel potential in the country, the State Governments will take necessary steps (i) to complete languishing projects, (ii) and to take up the execution of hydroelectric projects by resolving outstanding inter-state issues. The State Governments will also provide assistance to the CPSUs in acquiring land and other clearances/approvals to take up the execution of the hydel projects in the Central Sector for benefits in the 10th Plan (2002-2007).

 

National power grid

Keeping in view the imperative need to speedily develop a National Power Grid with appropriate transmission linkages at the state level for optimum utilisation of available generation within the various regions, the central and state sectors will substantially step up investment in transmission to complete the critical transmission lines and overcome the present mismatch in investment between generation and transmission of power.

 

Energy conservation

Realising the need to conserve energy, each state/union territory will formulate and launch an Action Plan for energy conservation. Government of India will introduce an Energy Conservation Bill in Parliament shortly.

 

Increase in power generation

In order to increase power generation quickly and reduce power shortages, at least ten power projects will be enabled to achieve financial closure and start construction by March 1999.

 

DETAILS OF PRIVATE SECTOR SCHEMES ACCORDED TECHNO-ECONOMIC CLEARANCE BY CEA

 

Hydro-electric Projects (Cap in MW)

Himachal Pradesh:

 

1.Baspa Stage-II HEP (300 MW) Jai Prakash Industries Ltd., J.A. Annexe, 54, Basant Lok, Vasant Vihar, New Delhi – 110057. Tel: 011-6141540,6147411, Fax: 011-6148890, 6145389.

2. Malana HEP (86) Rajasthan Spinning & Weaving Mills Ltd., Bhilwara Towers, A-12, Sector-1, Noida – 201301. Tel: 541810, 545772. Fax: 531648, 531748.

 

Madhya Pradesh

 

3. Maheshwar HEP (400) S. Kumars Ltd., C/o SMGPL Ltd., Niranjan, 99, Marine Drive, Mumbai – 400002. Tel: 022-4965701, 022-4965708.

 

Uttar Pradesh 4. Visnuprayag HEP (400) Jai Prakash Industries Ltd., J.A. Annexe, 54, Basant Lok, Vasant Vihar, New Delhi-110057, Tel: 011-6141799.

5. Srinagar HEP (330) Duncan North Hydro Power Co. Ltd., D-37 Panchsheel Enclave, New Delhi – 110017. Tel: 011-6288264.

Thermal Power Projects

Gujarat

6. Paguthan CCGT (654.7) Gujarat Torrent Energy Corporation Ltd., (GTEC), Torrent House, Off Ashram Road, Ahmedabad – 380009. Tel: 079-6587651, 6586388.

7. Hazira CCGT (515) Essar Power Ltd., 21, Feroze Gandhi Road, Lajpat Nagar-III, New Delhi-110024. Tel: 011-6842563, 6849546.

8. Baroda CCGT (167) Gujarat Industries Company Ltd., (GIPCL), P.O. Petrofils – 391347, Baroda. Ph - 0265-372768, 373213, 373159

9. Surat Lignite TPP (250) Gujarat Industries Power Corporation Limited, P.O. Petrofils, Baroda – 391347. Tel: 0265-372768, 373159.

10. Jamnagar TPP (500) Reliance Power Ltd., Meridien Commercial Tower, 5th Floor, Windsor Place, Janpath, New Delhi – 110001. Tel: 011-3710094, 011-3714295.

Maharashtra

11. Bhadravati TPP (1072) Central India Power Co. Ltd., (Nippon Denro Ispat Ltd.), Nirmal, 7th Floor, Nariman Point, Mumbai – 400021. Tel: 022-2820436, 2820514.

12. Patalganga CCGT (447) Reliance Patalganga Power Pvt. Ltd., Meridien Commercial Tower, 5th Floor, Windsor Place, Janpath, New Delhi –110001. Tel: 011-3710094.

Madhya Pradesh

13. Korba East (1070) Daewoo Power Limited, 33, Sirifort Road, New Delhi – 110049. Tel: 011-6250234.

14. Narsinghpur CCPP (166) GBL Power Ltd., 7, Nagin Mahal, 82, V. N. Road, Churchgate, Mumbai – 400020. Tel: 022-2040181, 2040374, 2041273.

15. Bina TPP (578) Bina Power Supply Co. Ltd., 92 & 93, A Wing, Mittal Court, Nariman Point, Mumbai – 400021. Tel: 2828574.

16. Korba West TPP (420) India Thermal Power Ltd., 25, Community Centre, 2nd Floor, Basant Lok, Vasant Vihar, New Delhi – 110057. Tel: 6885055, 673729.

17. Guna CCGT (342.25) STI Power India Ltd., 1F, 1st Floor, White House, 10, Mandi House, Bhagwan Das Road, New Delhi – 110001. Tel: 011-3386183-5.

18. Pench TPP (500) Pench Power Ltd., IC, White House, 10 Bhagwan Das Road, New Delhi – 110001. Tel: 011-3382624.

19. Bhander CCGT (342) Bhander Power Limited, Essar House, 11, Keshavrao Khadye Marg, Mahalakshmi Mumbai – 400034. Tel: 022-4950606.

20. Bhillai TPS (574) Bhilai Power Supply Company Ltd., Vijaya Building, 7th Floor, 17, Barakhamba Road, New Delhi – 110001. Tel: 011-3738337.

21. Pitampur DGPP (119.7) Shapoorji Pallonji Power Co. S.P. Centre, 41/44, Minoor Desai Marg, Colaba, Mumbai – 400005. Tel: 022-2871040.

22. Raigarh TPS Ph.I (550) Jindal Power Limited, Jindal Centre, 12, Bhikaji Cama Place, New Delhi – 110066. Tel: 011-6188375-80.

23. Ratlam DGPP (118.6) GVK Power (Ratlam Ltd.), Road No.1, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad – 500034. Tel: 040-3396883.

24. Khandwa CCGT (171.17) Madhya Bharat Energy Corp., M-15, 1st Floor, Greater Kailash-II, New Delhi – 110048. Tel: 011-6468867.

Andhra Pradesh

25. Jegurupadu CCGT (216) GVK Industries, Koh-I-noor, Road No.1, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad – 500034. Tel: 040-3396883.

26. Godavari CCGT (208) Spectrum Power Gen. Ltd. Door No. 6-28 & 6-29, Near L.B. Nagar, Municpal Office, Saroornagar, Hyderabad – 500035. Tel: 040-4042262.

27. Visakhapatnam TPP (1040) HNPCL, Tej Building, 2nd Floor, 8B, Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg, New Delhi – 110002. Tel: 011-3326801

28. Ramagundam TPP (520) BPL Power Projects (AP) Ltd., 708, Devika Tower, 6, Nehru Place, New Delhi – 110019. Tel: 11-6411035.

29. Kondapally CCGT (350) M/s. Kondapalli Power Corporation Ltd., LANCO House, 141, Avenue #8, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad – 500034. A.P. Tel: 040-3540697.

30. Krishnaptnam TPP (520) M/s. BBI Power Krishnapatnam Company, 193, Punchvati Colony, Road No. 4, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad – 500034. Tel: 040-315960, 3323587.

Some important addresses with e-mails

Andhra Pradesh Power Generation Corporation Ltd.,\ Vidyutsoudha, Khiratabad, Hyderabad – 500082. Tel: 040-3396800 Fax: 040-3317663 E-mail: contactus@apgenco.com

Andhra Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission, 8-2-283/B/1, Road No.3, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad – 500034. Tel: 040-3542681-84-85 Fax: 040-3542688 E-mail: aperc@ercap.org

Bhakra Beas Management Board, SCO 323-324,Sector 35, Chandigarh – 160022. Tele-fax: 172-600074 E-mail: bbmb.cs@chd.nic.in

Central Electricity Authority, Sewa Bhavan, R.K. Puram, New Delhi – 110066. Tel: 011-6108476, 6105619

Damodar Valley Corporation, DVC Towers, VIP Road, Kolkata – 700054. Tel: 033-3550647 E-mail: dvchq@wb.nic.in

Delhi Vidyut Board, Shakti Bhawan, Nehru Place, New Delhi – 110019. E-mail: Chairman@delhividyut.com

Dishergarh Power Supply Company Ltd., 8, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Sarani, Kolkata – 700001. Tel: 033-2426403, 2428210 Fax: 033-2426177 E-mail: dpscl@cal2.vsnl.net.in

Gujarat Power Corporation Ltd., Udyog Bhavan, Gandhinagar, Tel: 3235490-94 Fax: 3235513

Gujarat Electricity Regulatory Commission, 1st Floor, Neptune tower, Opposite Nehru Bridge, Ashram Road, Ahmedabad – 380009. Tel: 79-6580350 Fax: 79-6584542 E-mail: gerc@ad1.vsnl.net.in

Gujarat Energy Development Agency, Suraj Plaza II, 2nd Floor, Sayajigunj, Baroda. Tel: 0265-363123 & 361409 Fax: 0265-363120

Gujarat State Electricity Corporation Ltd., Vidhyut Bhavan, Race Course, Vadodara – 390015. Tel: 0265-355193-94-95 Fax: 0265-338848 E-mail: gsecl@icenet.net

Haryana Electricity Regulatory Commission, S.C.O180, Sector 5, Panchkula-134109, Haryana. Tel: 172-582531 Fax: 172-572359 E-Mail: herc@chd.nic.in

Karnataka Electricity Regulatory Commission, No. 9/2, 6th & 7th Floors, Mahalakshmi Chambers, M.G. Road, Bangalore – 560001. Tel: 080-5320213 & 5320214 Fax: 080-5320338 E-mail:kerc@vsnl.com

Maharashtra Electricity Regulatory Commission, 13th Floor, World Trade Centre, Cuffe Parade, Colaba, Mumbai – 400005. Tel: 022-2163964-65-69 Fax: 022-2163976

Maharashtra Energy Development Agency, New Kamani Chambers, 6th Floor, Ballard Estate, Mumbai – 400001. Tel: 022-2610259

Nathapa Jhakri Power Corporation Ltd., HIMFED Building, New Shimla – 171009. Himachal Pradesh Tel: 0177-270741, 270064 Fax: 0177-270542 E-mail: njpc.mopd@nde.vsnl.net.in

North Eastern Electric Power Corporation Ltd., Brookland Compound, Lower New Colony, Post Box 79, Shillong-793003, Meghalaya. Tel: 224487, 226453 Fax: 226417 E-mail: keepco.sh@vsnl.net.in

Orissa Electricity Regulatory Commission, Bidyut Niyamak Bhavan, Unit-VIII, Bhubaneswar – 751012. Tel: 674-413097, 427809 Fax: 674-413306 E-mail: info@orierc.org

Rajasthan Electricity Regulatory Commission, Shed No. 5, Vidyut Bhawan, Jyoti Nagar, Jaipur – 302005. Tel: 141-741181 & 741016 Fax: 141-741018 E-mail: info@rerc.gov.in

Rajasthan Energy Development Agency, Vidyut Bhawan, Janpath, Jaipur – 302005. Rajasthan E-mail: info@rajenergy.com

Rural Electrification Corporation Ltd., Scope Complex, Core No. 4, 7, Lodhi Road, New Delhi – 11003 Fax: 4360644 E-mail: recltd@nda.vsnl.net.in

Tamil Nadu Electricity Regulatory Commission, 17, Third Main Road, Seethamma Colony, Alwarpet, Chennai – 600018. Tel: 044-4322037 Fax: 044-4354982 E-mail: tnerc@tn.nic.in

Tehri Hydro Development Corporation Ltd., A-10, Sector-1, Kribhco Bhawan, Noida – 201301, Uttar Pradesh. Tel: 4525764, 4525836 Fax: 4545092

Uttar Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission, 2nd Floor, Kisan Mandi Bhawan, Gomti Nagar, Vibhuti Khand, Lucknow – 226010. Tel: 522-300354 Fax: 522-300292 E-mail: secretary@uperc.org

Water & Power Consultancy Services (I) Ltd., 26, K.G. Marg, “Kailash”, 5th Floor, New Delhi – 110001. Tel: 3731120 Fax: (08282) 66432 E-mail: wapcas@del2.vsnl.net.in

 

POWER UPDATE

 

 

Rs 27 cr captive plant commissioned

 

Tata Sponge Iron Limited (TSIL), a wholly owned subsidiary of Tata Steel, has set up a 7.5 mw captive power plant (CPP) at a cost of Rs. 27 crore in its complex at Bilaipada, near Joda in Keonjhar district of Orissa.

While TSIL will use 5mw of CPP power, a surplus 2.5 mw will be transported to its promoter company, Tata Steel, whole mines & ferro alloys plant are located only 7 km away in Jodia

Karnataka for mega power schemes

The State Government has begun pushing for new projects as joint ventures with the state-owned Karnataka Power Corporation Ltd. (KPCL) in association with the Jindal group.

These include the expansion of the Jindal Tractebel Power Company Ltd. (JTPCL) to the extent of 25 per cent. This expansion project involves an addition of 500 MW capacity. This project is being brought bypassing the bid route, the note implies. This expansion project is in addition to the Bellary Thermal Power Station, formerly known as the Vijaynagar Thermal Power Station, where the Jindals are expected to participate in the equity to the extent of 25 per cent. According to the note, the project has been planned as a 1,000 MW station (2x500).

 

Tata Power to expand its broad band

Tata Power officials said the company plans to invest around Rs. 800 crore on its broad band business alone in the next couple of years. These include investing around Rs. 300 crore for laying fibre optic cables in Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Pune and Hyderabad and another Rs. 500 crore for linking these the cities together. One-third of this project will be funded through equity and the remaining two-thirds through debt. Tata Power has already invested over Rs. 100 crore for building an OFC network in Mumbai.

 

The company has laid around 575-km network in Mumbai and the work on another 300 km cable network towards Pune will be completed soon. A part of Tata Power’s fiber optic network in Mumbai will be ready for commercial use soon and the company has signed up three large clients to provide fast Internet access and connectivity.

 

Tata Power has just signed a memorandum of understanding with Gail to lay cables along the 10,000-km long RoW owned by the gas major. The company has bought its equipment from the global majors like Cisco Systems and Sycamore Network.

 

Tata Power is planning to set up a 500-mw coal-fired power plant in Jharkhand and would focus on large captive power projects. The company has signed a MoU with sugar cooperatives in Maharashtra to set up five bagasse-based projects having a cumulative capacity of over 100 mw.

 

The company is also exploring possibilities to foray into solar energy based power generation and talks are on with the Maharashtra state government.

 

 

NTPC to sign MoU with Rlys

 

The National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) in New Delhi is likely to sign a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Indian Railway for supply of power directly to the transport utility bypassing state electricity board.

 

The railways have put forward a requirement of around 1,500 mw of power from NTPC, which they are currently sourcing at expensive rates from different SEBs.

 

PowerGrid invites Eols for developing national grid

 

PowerGrid Corporation of India Ltd has invited Expressions of Interest (Eol) from private players for participation in the development of the Indian National Grid. This was stated by the Union minister for power Suresh Prabhu at the inauguration of the Elecrama - 2002 exhibition, organised by the Indian Electrical & Electronics Manufacturers'' Association(IEEMA).

 

Suresh Prabhu said that the Centre has a plan outlay of Rs 1,500 crore for the year 2001-02, which will be used to improve commercial viability of state electricity boards (SEBs) in a short time. He added that the fund will be made available only to the states who would sign an agreement with the Central government.

 

According to Prabhu, most of the states are expected to sign the memorandum of understanding (MoU) by the end of this month.

 

 

A. K. Sardana - Vice President, (BD&Epc) BSES Ltd.

Kindly give us a list of power projects executed by you and ones ongoing currently. List of Power Project executed and under execution are as under:

Projects on Anvil:

a) 2 X 210 MW Thermal Power Plant of UPRVUN at Paricha

b) 30 MW COFG and BFG based Power Plant at Goa.

c) Globe Co-generation - 45 MW Bagasse fired Power Plant in Karnataka

d) STI Power - 330 MW CCPP at Guna, MP.

e) ST BSES - 25 MW Washery Rajects based Power Plant at Kobra

f) Maithon Power - 100 MW Thermal Power Plant

g) Suma Powergen – 60 MW Gas based Power Plant at Agartala, Tripura

h) Global Energy – 22 MW Bagasse fired Power Plant at Belgundi Karnatala

Construction constitutes 20% of a power projects’ investment generally. Does it vary depending on the whether it is coal-based, thermal or hydro?

Construction part in the complete Power Plant varies depending on the type of power plant. For a coal / bagasse fired power plant, construction is app. 20% of the project cost while for a combined cycle power plant it may be app. 15% and for a hydro power project, construction may very from 30-40% or even more of the project cost.

Which contractors have you dealt with satisfactorily?

Contractors with whom we have had satisfactory dealings:

a) Consolidated Construction b) Mukand Limited c) Bygging India d) General Mechanical works e) Unitech Machines f) Universal Erectors g)Pace Process

Does construction equipment availability cause delays?

On a macro level, availability of construction equipment does not cause delays in execution of the projects.

What are the main causes of delay in implementing power projects once the financing and agreement with the electricity board is signed and cleared?

Causes of delay in implementing power project after financial closure are as under:

a) Revisions in power purchase agreements with SEBs resulting in total change in the viability of the projects and financing arrangements

b) Delay in receipt of documents required for availing concessional customs duty etc.

c) Delay in making arrangements for off-take of power by SEBs / Govt. authorities.

d) Timely payment from client

e) Timely approval of drawings from clients / engineer.

Given the target of 1,00,000 mw in the next ten years, do you foresee large contracting and construction opportunities emerging?

Achieving the target of 100,000 MW in next 10 years seems to be ambitious. However, this 100,000 MW of capacity addition is definitely associated with large contracting and construction opportunities. (contracting oportunities to the tune of app. Rs. 4000 billion and construction opportunity to the tune of app. Rs. 800 billion).

BSES PROJECTS LIST

BSES PROJECTS LIST

 

DescriptionStatus 1. 2X250MW Coal Fired Thermal Power: Project-Dahanu, Mumbai

 

Executed

2. 230MW gas based Combined Cycle Power Plant for BAP Ltd., Samalkot and A.P.

Under Execution

3. 165 MW Combined Cycle Power Plant For BKPL, Kerala on liquid fuel 1 X 250 MW Lignite Power Project at Sri

Executed

4. Mushnam, Tamil Nadu for TICAPCO.

Under Execution

5. 33 MW Thermal Power Plant for Monnet Power Ltd., Raipur, M.P. – Waste Heat Recovery based (8 MW) and coal based (25 MW)

Executed

6. 24 MW Bagasse based Captive Thermal Power Plant for Godavari Sugar Ltd., Sameerwadi, Karnataka.

Under Execution

7. 22.5 MW Bagasse based Thermal Power Plant for Global Energy Ltd, Belgundi, Karnataka,

Under Execution

8. 2.5 MW D.G. set based Captive Power Plant for ITC, Bangalore.

Executed

9. 3x2.5 MW DG based Power Plant for National Institute of Biologicals, India, (just completed)

Executed

10. 3 MW Captive Power Project for Alok Textiles at Vapi, Gujarat

Under Execution

11. 106 MW CCPP at Dhuvran Gujarat

Under Execution

12. 12.5MW Lignite/Coal Based Power Project for Dharni Cement (Grasim West) at Trichy, Tamil Nadu

Under Execution

13. NTPC-Supply of 2000KVA DG Sets to EOC, NTPC

Under Execution

 

 

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  Trade Opportunities in Power Sector

 

MR YAN JIYING,

PRESIDENT,

TINAJIN CENTURY ELECTRONICS CO. LTD.

1st Floor No. 4 Wen King Road, Tinajin, China 300074. Tel: 86 22 28362870, 283 62867 Fax: 86 22 28362856, E-mail: scdz@public.tpt.tj.cn

Website: www.china-rectfier.com.cn

Export power electronic devices from India.

 

MR. SANDER YUAN

CHNZE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENTS CO. LTD.

No. 17-505, Lumingyuan, Lucheng Industrial Zone, Wenzhou, China 325007. Tel: 86 577 88776861, 88776862 Fax: 86 577 88776860

E-mail: qunze@mail.wzptt.zj.cn, chnze@mail.wptt.zj.cn

Website:www.chnze.com,

www. electricbase.com

 

 

Export low voltage electrical appliances from India

 

 

“The construction cost for a typical hydro project could be in the region of 50% plus."

T. Sankaralingam - Director (Projects), NTPC Ltd.

 

What are your ongoing projects?

Our ongoing projects are as under:

Project State Capacity Simhadri: Andhra Pradesh: 1000MW

Talchekr : Orissa: 2000MW

(Kaniha) II

Ramagundam III: Andhra Pradesh: 500MW

Rihand II: Uttar Pradesh: 1000MW

Koldam Hydro: H.P.: 800MW

Which projects are currently on the anvil?

Project currently on anvil

Project State Capacity Sipat I: Chhattisgarh: 1900 MW

Barh: Bihar: 1980 MW

Kahalgaon: Bihar: 1320 MW

Vindhyachal III: Madhya Pradesh: 1000 MW

Unchahar II; Uttar Pradesh: 210 MW

Dadri II: Chattisgarh: 490 MW

Sipat II: Rajasthan: 660 MW

Anta (Gas based): Rajasthan: 650 MW

Auraiya (gas based): Uttar Pradesh: 650 MW

Kawas (gas based): Gujarat: 650 MW

Gandhar (gas based): Gujarat: 650 MW

Construction constitutes 20% of a power projects investment generally. Does it very depending on the whether it is coal-based, thermal or hydro?

In thermal projects, the construction cost for a gas/liquid based project is less compared to a coal based project. The construction cost for a coal based project is around 20% of the total project cost and that of a gas / liquid fuel based project is around 13-14% (inclusive of cost of civil works for both coal and gas projects). The construction cost for a typical hydro project could be in the region of 50% plus. All these costs are excluding land cost and includes cost of total civil works.

Which contractors have you dealt with satisfactorily?

 

NTPC has added nearly 20,000 MW in last 25 years of its existence. During these years numerous contracting agencies have worked with us and as a result NTPC has been able to complete its projects on/ahead of schedule. It is difficult to list out names of such agencies here. Except for new agencies, generally all contracting agencies have come up to the expectation of NTPC in commissioning its projects on time.

 

Does construction equipment availability cause delays?

 

Yes, non-availability of construction equipment at times is a major source of delay. Most of the NTPC projects are set up in remote areas where construction equipments are not readily available. Therefore, NTPC has a policy of tying up major construction T&P with the construction agencies, right at the time of finalisation of contract.

 

At Simhadri project near Vizag, the availability of T&P in the nearby industrial belt was a major enabling factor in speeding up of the project work.

 

 

What are the main causes of delay in implementing power projects once the financing and agreement projects with the electricity board is signed and cleared?

While NTPC has executed almost all its projects on schedule, in our view the main cause of delay is generally the lack of project management capabilities of many contracting agencies. It, therefore, increases the responsibility of NTPC to tie up every loose end to see that activities are properly planned and executed. Delays also happen because of delay in land acquisition. Frequent and sudden changes in govt. policy also leads to delay in execution of the contract already entered into which in turn delays the project. Disintegration of erstwhile USSR in the late eighties/early nineties was a major cause of delay in Soviet projects.

 

Given the target of 10,000 mw in the next ten years, do you foresee large contracting and construction opportunities emerging?

Yes, in order to achieve this optimistic target, constructing agencies have to mobilise on a large scale. Maximum capacity achieved during a 5 year plan so far has been 21,401 mw during the Seventh Plan. Thus this will require nearly 2.5 times capacity addition to be achieved in a plan period with respect to the best achieved so far. Naturally, this can only be achieved with increased contracting and construction activities.

 

Contact: NTPC Bhawan, SCOPE Complex, 7, Instutional Area, Lodhi Road, New Delhi - 110 003. Ph: (O): 4361199, 4360044 (R): 6014357 Fax: 011 - 4363050 Website: www.ntpc.net<

 

"We do see large contracting companies emerging. Particularly in the coal fired power sector."

 

- Srinivas Duvvuri Area Director, (India/SAARC Region),

Pratt & Whitney Power Systems, United Technologies International Operations, Inc.

Kindly give us a list of power projects executed by you and ones ongoing currently.

At this time Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS) have not executed any power projects in India Region. We have entered this region after significant experience in other parts of the world and putting in place the after-market support needed to guide customers through the requirements of operations and maintenance of gas turbine based power plants. PWPS have about 2000 gas turbines installed worldwide, and makes it one of the most experienced in offering technologically advanced and financially competitive solutions to power generation, and aftermarket services.

 

Which projects are currently on the anvil?

 

We have opportunities in the 1 mw through 120 mw projects which have been under evaluation for some time now. The success of the project structuring and other approvals would ultimately dictate the selection of our gas turbines.

 

Which contractors have you dealt with satisfactorily?

 

Globally we have worked with major EPC contractors, and locally we believe L&T to be a formidable player.

 

 

What are the main causes of delay in implementing power projects once the financing and agreement with the electricity board is signed and cleared?

 

The major components of any power project are financing, PPA, fuel contract, EPC, and O&M contracts, apart from others. Availability and reaching the fuel (natural gas or distillate fuels) to a site takes quite some time, and in the past have contributed to delays. Comfort and perception of risk by the owners and lenders relating to establishing an acceptable payment security mechanism goes through various iterations and re-work by individual state governments and power purchasing authorities. These have added to the delays.

 

Contact: Srinivas Duvvuri Area Director, (India/SAARC Region) Pratt & Whitney Power Systems United Technologies International Operations, Inc. # 503, Paharpur Business Center > 21, Nehru Place Greens, New Delhi 110 019 (India)

 

Technology

No Alternative to vertical expansion

  Time is ripe to develop a high-rise science in India. There is no alternative left except to expand vertically and to fulfil the housing and commercial accommodation needs of the country. While the country looks skywards, there is an urgent need to lay specific guidelines for the construction of high-rise buildings. JAGVIR GOYAL who is a Senior Executive Engineer (civil) with the Punjab government and who has presented papers in national and international conferences, examines these aspects and puts forth certain steps based on his study of foreign experiences over the years.

 

The ‘high-rise movement’ is in the offing in India too. Population explosion coupled with the hard fact that the area of land available with us is fixed, has changed the direction of the ‘development arrow’ from horizontal to vertical. Urbanization is approaching its peak. There is a revolution on the information technology front with more and more citizens becoming ‘netizens’. Such a situation tends to break all restrictions and force its way to expansion. With the available ‘earth-space’ shrinking day by day, the only alternative left is to look towards the ‘sky’ and give birth to sky-scrapers.

New York’s famous night-view makes one believe that the high-rise towers are not scraping the sky but intruding into it. The 102 storeyed Empire State Building, inaugurated way back on August 30, 1929, still fascinates the onlookers. At that time, it could have been a case of giving shape to one’s dreams but today, high-rise structures have become a necessity. Land becoming dearer, its cost can be divided among dwelling units only if multi-storeyed buildings are erected. Cost of external services can also be cut down and parking facilities can be increased if horizontal development gives way to vertical expansion. Keeping India’s economic conditions in view, vertical expansion becomes all the more necessary.

 

  Housing Shortage :In India, the VEB (Vertical Expansion Bug) has bitten the metros only. The population has crossed one billion! Yet people have four-canal houses, single-storeyed buildings, horizontal commercial centers, with Government offices opened in old, dilapidated buildings. There is an urgent need to demolish all unsafe and old structures, to free precious land, to utilize it in a judicious manner and to erect multi-storeyed, tall buildings wherever possible. The housing shortage has been estimated to be around 35 million. Though shelter was enshrined as a fundamental right in the Constitution of India, housing could not get the attention it deserved as there were multiple problems to be tackled at other fronts. Of the houses available in the country, only 40% can be reckoned as properly built while the rest come under the category of temporary housing. In order to fulfill the shortage and to make available such a large number of dwelling units, the only solution is to build tall, multi-storeyed buildings having different sizes of accommodation for lower, middle and upper income categories. If there is no action now, soon we will be forced to do so. There is no alternative!

 

 

 

Time is ripe to develop a high-rise science. So far as tall industrial structures are concerned, well defined written word is available. However multi-storeyed commercial, residential and office towers are demanding ready availability of detailed guidelines that need to be followed as and when the VEB bites more and more cities.

 

 

 

As the country gears itself to expand vertically, many new factors that need to be given special attention, raise their heads. Devastation caused by the Bhuj earthquake sent the country reeling and sheer necessity of having earthquake resistant buildings was felt by the country. Occasional sight of towering infernos draws attention towards fire safety measures. Provision of fast and quick vertical transport systems in high rise buildings is mandatory to keep the buildings efficient and this is an additional factor to be watched. Maximum usage of modern construction equipment to ensure faster and better construction is a must and equipment manufacturers all over the world are to be encouraged to market their equipment in India. Above all, safety measures—an aspect often neglected by the builders in India is to be given due consideration. An overview of these aspects is important.

 

 

Earthquake Resistant Buildings :

The Bhuj experience : The earthquake that shook Bhuj and surrounding areas of Gujarat, India on 26th January,2001 left the state gasping for breath. There was death and devastation all around. Cities and towns on the whole were destroyed. Major cause of an alarming death toll was construction of tall buildings without making them earthquake resistant. These buildings were unable to withstand an earthquake of just 8.1 magnitude on Richter’s scale. No earthquake safety measures were taken by the builders though the area fell under severe seismic zone.

Avoiding collapse of buildings : It is not the earthquake but the collapse of buildings that causes destruction and loss of human lives. Earthquakes will do least harm if the collapse of buildings is avoided. The buildings may sway, deform, crack or distort but must not collapse. Seismic forces assume greater significance with the increase in height of buildings and affect the structural design of the building in a big way. ‘Total deflection’ at the top of the building increases with the increase in its slenderness ratio and this has to be taken care of. The architect however will not compromise over the services to be given to end-users of the building and will ask for wall free or column free floors where necessary. The ceilings too may be required to be flat and unhindered to accommodate AC-ducts and electrical fixtures above false-ceilings. Under such circumstances, the following guidelines may prove very useful.

(i) A tube-structure may be found highly effective in resisting seismic loads. Such a structure was first suggested by Owings and Merill, Chicago. In this structure, the core of the building is kept stiff while columns are provided along its periphery and are connected by spandrel beams. A ‘Flat-slab’ design is preferred for ceilings as it does away with beams.

(ii) The structural frame-work should be kept as highly redundant or indeterminate during design. Such a structure will provide better resistance to lateral earthquake forces.

(iii) The mass of the buildings should be kept as less as possible. Light weight materials should be brought under use. Lesser is the self-weight of the building, lesser will be the earthquake force affecting it. (iv) The seismic zone of the area having the building must be kept in view during designing, alongwith the wind velocity in that area.

(v) Deflection-diagram of the building should be studied and joints should be so designed that a cumulative effect of deflection does not occur in any member.

(vi) Sub-soil investigations must be carried out in the field to ascertain the bearing capacity of the soil and other factors. The investigating agency must carry a high rating. Investigation results must be realistic and authenticated.

(vii) For buildings taller than 30 meters, model analysis should be carried out to study the behavior of the building under random motion of ground.

(viii) For buildings taller than 75 meters, dynamic behavior of the structure must be studied.

(ix) A large damage occurs due to break-out of fires on occurrence of an earthquake. No time may be available to operate fire fighting equipment. The buildings should therefore be provided with escape routes for instant use by the occupants.

(x) The vibrations due to earthquakes rise in buildings from foundation upwards. The buildings should therefore be provided with bearings that are able to absorb shock waves.

Fire safety :

From time to time, reports of high rise buildings getting destroyed by major fires and loss of several lives have been hitting the newspaper headlines. A few such instances can be listed here :

i)October,1992 : Krishi Bhavan , New Delhi holding many important offices , was completely gutted.

ii)April, 1990 : Prestigious Vigyan Bhavan, New Delhi, a host to many national and international events completely ravaged by the intense blaze.

iii)January, 1986 : Siddhartha Continental Hotel, New Delhi destroyed in fire claiming 37 lives.

iv)June, 1983 : Gopala Towers, New Delhi got engulfed in fire, trapping 400 people in it.

v)January, 1972 : 21-storeyed SBI Building, Mumbai destroyed by fire claiming 9 lives.

Each mishap sends a grim reminder to builders in the country, to adopt minimum required safety measures and evacuation facilities for high rise buildings. In addition to earthquake resistance, fire safety is the second most important factor to be kept in mind. The country has not to give birth to ‘Towering Infernos’. The guidelines in this regard should include the following :

(i) In case of fire, the main stairs of high-rise buildings should get isolated from the rest of building by automatic closing of fire-doors and should further be pressurized with bouts of fresh air.

(ii) An automatic system should close the air-conditioning system of the building thus stopping re-circulation of air and smoke; it should at the same time, activate ventilation fans to suck in fresh air to all those floors that are not affected by fire.

(iii) Provision of a computer-system loaded with software to analyze the fire-situation and provision to make announcements over the public address system should be made mandatory.

(iv) The electrical equipment and installations provided in the buildings must be of a high standard. The building should be designed to carry an emergency power supply in addition to the main supply. The main supply should automatically switch off in case of fire. The emergency supply should turn on to run ventilation fans.

(v) Safe exit-routes and escape stairs should be planned in the design of the building.

(vi) Sufficient area around each high rise building should be kept open and unoccupied for free movement of fire-tenders.

(vii) Provision of exhaust machinery and water tanks of sufficient capacity in the basement of buildings should be ensured as the basements are susceptible to fire.

(viii) Shafts for electric cables should be separate and not common with those for water supply and telephone lines. These should be provided with fire resistance seals.

(ix) Provision of smoke detectors, automatic fire sensing systems, breathing apparatuses and sprinkler systems should be made on each floor of the high rise buildings.

(x) Existence of combustible materials in buildings proves to be of a major disadvantage in controlling a fire. Wherever such materials are used, these should be painted with in-tumescent coatings to avoid spread of fire.

Vertical Transport System :

Having a fast and efficient Vertical Transport System is another factor to be considered while planning to raise a high-rise building. The following points should be given due consideration in this regard:

(i) A ‘Traffic study’ involving accurate assessment of building users must be made. Traffic flow measurements should inform on the number of persons that ride the elevators in a five minute period. Peak demand hours should be identified.

(ii) Elevators should be located in the central core of the building for the quickest and most efficient carriage of vertical traffic.

(iii) All elevators should operate under ‘Group control’ system rather than independent control to avoid disproportionate loading. Under the ‘Group control’ system, several cars respond to a call. Thus a centralized and group-controlled system responds best.

(iv) All cars(elevators) should be fitted with overload devices. Such a device keeps the car-doors open, sounds a buzzer and switches on a warning light whenever the car-load exceeds 10% of rated capacity.

(v) All cars should be provided with Automatic Rescue Devices (ARD). These devices send the cars to nearest floors in case of power failures and even open the doors.

Sears Tower in Chicago, USA is a 110-story building and is one of the tallest office buildings in the world. It carries a 106-cab elevator system including 16 double decker elevators. The top deck known as Skydeck rises 1,353 feet above ground level and two express elevators soar to this altitude in just over a minute—so efficient is the ‘vertical transport system’!

Modern Construction Equipment:

Maximum usage of Modern Construction Equipment should be made while raising tall buildings and sky-scrapers if good quality work and faster construction is to be ensured. The equipment manufacturers all around the world have developed amazingly fast, accurate and durable construction equipment. They must be encouraged to market their equipment in India. The following specifications should be compulsorily adopted :

(i) RMC plants should be installed at the site of the high-rise building and all concrete used should be Ready-Mixed-Concrete only.

(ii) Use of super-plasticizers that are fully compatible with the cement under use should be made to the maximum possible extent.

(iii) Maximum concrete pouring should be done by use of concrete-pumps. Super-plasticizers will help in free flow of concrete through placer booms without increasing water-cement ratio.

(iv) Sophisticated form-work systems such as slip-forms, hydraulic jump-forms, should be put to use wherever possible. This factor should be kept in mind at the time of building-design itself.

Safety Measures :

Importance : Safety in construction is one area often relegated to the bottom rung of priorities by builders and engineers. Irreparable loss of money, manpower and progress may occur whenever a scaffolding fails, a roof collapses or a fatal accident takes place at the worksite. It has been a common experience that once a worker loses his life in an accident at site, the morale of the working force sinks to a new low. The spirit and the progress of work never remain the same. Despite this realization, the safety aspect is often ignored. Indians react only when some untoward incident occurs, and then begin to take safeguards. This tendency needs to be curbed.

Situation in India : Findings of International Labor Organization reveal that the accident rate among industrial workers is highest in India, touching 4 per 1000 and a major share is attributed to the construction sector. Indian construction industry is highly labor-intensive. Though mechanization in construction projects is inevitable, machines are being adopted in a very slow manner. Labor is cheap, unorganized, unaware of its rights and mostly struggling to make both ends meet. Builders, therefore, find it convenient and profitable to use manpower rather than machines.

Builders dread occurrence of an accident at their work-sites. They know that one fatal accident may result in closure of work for a few days and rise of fear among workers who may refuse to work at higher elevations. Not only this, the credibility of the builder may be at stake. He may have to pay a large amount on account of compensation, if the workers are not covered under group insurance. Besides, he has to wriggle out of legal complications arising upon occurrence of the accident. Now certain organizations have begun to ask for ‘certified accident record’ of the builders before allotting works to them. A high incidence may result in disqualification of a builder. However safety measures are still found wanting.

Construction Safety Manual :

It is time that a ‘Construction Safety Manual’ is evolved, made a part of standard tender document in every organization and strictly enforced by the supervising agency. Some teething troubles may arise in doing so, but gradually the safety aspect will become a part and parcel of every site and builders will not hesitate to spend on this account.

Looking for a concise guideline on safety in construction, some of the requirements may be summed up and classified in a few categories as under :

Safety measures while handling tools, equipment and machinery:

1. All electric tools must be properly insulated.

2. All winches and hoists shall be provided with magnetic brakes for automatic operation on failure of electricity.

3. No metallic ladders shall be used when high voltage electric wires are passing overhead.

4. Only skilled persons shall be allowed to handle equipment or machinery.

5. All compressed gas cylinders shall be stored in upright position only, with their valve caps in position. 6. All equipment shall be properly earthed.

7. No electric tools shall be used while standing in water and without taking proper precautions.

8. All wire ropes shall be thoroughly checked against any broken strands.

9. Flash back arrestors shall be provided on gas cylinders.

10. All machine guards shall be kept in position while the machines are running.

11. No discarded tools, equipment or machinery shall be used.

12. The scaffoldings and the wooden planks used shall be strong and durable.

Accessories to be provided to the workers:

1. All workers shall be provided with safety helmets when work at higher elevations is in progress.

2. All workers deployed at higher elevations shall wear safety belts.

3. Protective gloves, shoes and aprons shall be provided to all workers handling electric equipment and chemicals.

4. Ear plugs shall be provided to workers deployed in high noise level locations.

5. Face masks or nose filters shall be worn by workers in areas where obnoxious gases are released by chimneys or chemical plants. Respiratory equipment shall be available for use when required.

6. Safety goggles and shields shall be used by workers engaged in welding work.

7. Gum-boots and torches shall be provided to workers working inside tunnels.

8. Breathing air hoods shall be provided to workers doing sand blasting or spray painting work.

9. Other accessories as suggested by ‘Safety organization’ with respect to the nature of work shall be provided. Safety arrangements to be made at site of work:

1. ‘Men working overhead’ sign boards shall be placed around structures on which work is in progress at higher elevations.

2. All floor openings in intermediate floors of a building shall be kept covered with gratings. Otherwise temporary protective railings shall be provided.

3. Warning lights (during night ) and red flags ( during daytime ) shall be provided around dangerous areas of working, near ground-level water tanks & near trenches and excavations.

4. Proper railing shall be provided around all working platforms at higher levels.

5. Nylon safety-mesh shall enwrap working platforms of high-rise structures.

6. Sufficient illumination of all working levels and access arrangements shall be ensured.

7. Any spill-over of oil or grease on ladders, stairs or landings shall be cleaned at once.

8. The height of ladders shall be restricted. Very long ladders shall not be allowed. Intermediate platforms shall be provided to give relief to workers going up.

9. All access arrangements shall be inspected by the engineer to be safe and well supported before allowing their use by the workers.

10. Proper bearing shall be provided to the planks and battens used in temporary platforms. No overhangs shall be permitted.

11. All scaffoldings and shuttering shall be well braced and supported. It must be examined and passed by the engineer before allowing pouring of concrete. 12. In ‘enclosed’ working areas such as tunnels, proper ventilation arrangements shall be made.

13. Full arrangements for storage and handling of explosives, radio-active elements and chemicals shall be made.

14. Fire fighting equipment shall always be kept ready. Fire extinguishers shall not be allowed to expire.

15. All working platforms shall be kept clear of projecting nails in wooden planks.

Safety measures when work is in progress:

1. Vertical cuts in excavation, if any, shall be fully braced or shored.

2. All excavated earth shall be stacked away from the cutting edge to avoid its falling over workers and burying them.

3. Site-offices and stores shall be located at a safe distance from the working area. This shall be specially ensured while constructing a high-rise structure.

4. All vehicles shall be parked away from work-site and the excavated area.

5. Periodic checks of wire-ropes, wooden planks, scaffoldings, shuttering, electric wires & cables and access arrangements shall be carried out.

Safety Organization :

On major projects, a Safety Organization should be established that strictly emphasize safety. On minor projects or construction sites, Safety engineers should be appointed. They should ensure implementation of the above points. In addition, they should see that

i) Medical facilities and first aid is available at site

ii) An ambulance or a vehicle is always available to carry an accident victim to hospital

iii) One or two persons are trained in giving artificial respiration

iv) Accidents are reported at once to the Project-heads. Safety organization should celebrate ‘Safety weeks’ to create awareness among workers. Safety awards should be instituted. Accident investigations, lodging of claims and payment of compensation should be ensured by this organization. Accidents must be declared intolerable. Safety must be assigned priority. As per a recent survey, Indian construction industry employs 32 million people of whom 24 million are workers. No doubt, they are a large force. Making them undergo safety training programs may not look feasible at this stage, but they can certainly be motivated to follow safety rules by holding safety talks from time to time.

Conclusion:

A look at the world’s tallest twin towers in Kuala Lumpur with a height of 1,483 feet, the 1,454 feet high Sears tower in USA, 75-storeyed Interstate World Trade Center, Los Angeles and many other such structures enthrall one and all. It is heartening to note that hundreds of tall super-structures in USA have been designed and built by Indians. High-tech support including wonderful software packages are becoming available in India and brilliant academic achievements are galore. If the latest equipment is available in plenty, there is nothing to hold the country back. Now is the right time to touch dizzying heights. India must not lose any more time in seizing this opportunity.

References:

- Alpa Sheth, 1992

- High rise offices-a structural engineer’s view point, Indian Architect and Builder, September, 1992, p65.

- Goyal Jagvir, 1999

- Criminal Neglect of Safety, The Tribune, p16.

- Goyal Jagvir, 1999

- Time to switch over to RMC, The Tribune, p16.

- Goyal Jagvir, 1999

- Vertical Expansion, The Tribune, p16.

- Goyal Jagvir, 2001

- Coping with the calamity, The Tribune, p16.

- India at 50, 1997

- Housing, Express Publications, pp688

- Indian Standard Institution, 1975

- Criteria for Earthquake resistant design of structures, IS 1893, p72.

 

Special Report

Chinagate: Engineering Breakthroughs 

  On a recent visit to China, J. K. VARSHNEYA, Former Member (Engg.), Delhi Development Authority, witnessed four path-breaking civil engineering projects taking place in China. A report.

 

  The economic growth of China in the last two decades has stunned the world. While the Asian Tigers are facing recession and negative growth, China has still managed 7.3 per cent GDP growth in 2001. There is one single reason for this economic miracle – world-class infrastructure on a giant scale. The current slogan in China is “Have it (the infrastructure) and they (the investors) will come”. And no wonder China attracts 40 to 45 billion USD Foreign Direct Investment every year. Four giant civil engineering projects which are taking shape in China and which will create new benchmarks and spur economic growth are described below. The Three Gorges Dam Project It was Napolean who dreamt of the English Channel Tunnel, and today it is a reality. It was Dr. Sun Yat-sen, pioneer of the Chinese democratic revolution, who more than 70 years ago dreamt of the Three Gorges Dam Project on China’s mightiest river – The Yangtze, which, in a few years time, will be a reality. After decades of investigations, research and planning, the Chinese Government approved the Project in 1992. The work on the project started in 1993 and is expected to be completed by 2009 at an estimated cost of USD 28 billion. The colossal project involves the construction of a 2 km, 185 m-high dam across the Yangtze river creating a 550 km long storage reservoir – the world’s largest. The Three Gorges Project has its main benefits in flood control, power generation and navigation. The most important role of the dam will be in flood control. The Yangtze is prone to repeated flooding, often causing great loss of life and property. Several catastrophic floods have occurred in the last century in 1931, 1935, 1954 and more recently in 1991, when more than 2,000 people are believed to have perished. The project reservoir with a flood control capacity of 22 billion cu. m. will absorb once in a 100-year frequency flood. The project will improve navigation in the upper reaches of the Yangtze immensely. The new lake will enable 10,000 ton tow boats to sail upto Chongqing. The navigation capacity of the river is going to increase from 10 million tons per year to 50 million tons per year. The Three Gorges Hydropower Station will have an installed capacity of 18,200 mw. There will be 26 generator units, each having a capacity of 700 mw. The work on the installation of the first unit started in November 2001 and will start operating in 2003. When completed in 2009, it will be the world’s largest hydropower plant. Environmental Protection The project will supply clean energy, replacing the burning of 50 million tons of coal per annum. Great care is being taken to improve and protect the environment of the Three Gorges area. The Chongqing Municipality and other authorities will spend nearly USD 5.3 billion in the next decade, towards environmental protection. It is planned to return more than 133,000 ha of cultivated land on slopes to forests or grassland. Around 667,000 ha of land on barren mountain slopes will be afforested. The city is also going to shut down a number of highly polluting units and control discharge of pollutants into the reservoir. Hundreds of sewage treatment plants and effluent treatment plants will be constructed. Very recently the Chongqing Municipality has introduced very stringent regulations for pollution control in the Three Gorges area. Maximum fine for water polluters is now upto USD 120,000. Great care is also being taken to preserve the natural habitat of the Chinese river Dolphin and the Chinese sturgeon. Effective measures are also being taken to protect and relocate important historical and archaeological sites. About 1.13 million people will be relocated owing to the construction of the project. Most of the resettled Three Gorges residents now live in spacious apartments with per capita floor area of 25 sq. m. Golmud-Lhasa Railway line The Chinese railway engineers have undertaken one of the greatest construction feats of all times – the construction of a 1,118-km long railway line from Golmud in Qinghai province to Lhasa, capital to Tibet. More than 960 km of the railway line will be built at an altitude of more than 4,000 metres. And more than half of it will be laid on earth frozen for a long time. It will be the longest and most elevated railway built on highlands anywhere in the world. The USD 2.5 billion railroad to be completed by 2007 is part of China’s “Go West” policy of opening up and absorbing the western regions into mainstream Chinese economy. China has been considering the Qinghai-Tibet railway for over five decades. The rapid economic growth and technological advance over the past two decades have given the country enough national strength to complete the project. The work which started on June 29 last year is progressing well even during winters. The maximum day temperature in Golmud is minus ten degrees centigrade in December. South-North Water Diversion Project Very soon work will start on the world’s largest water diversion project in China which will transfer upto 48 billion cubic metres of water from the China’s longest river, the Yangtze in southern China, to water-starved Beijing, Tianjin etc. in the north at an estimated cost of USD18 billion. The northern parts of China are suffering from acute water shortage. The once torrential Yellow river now runs dry for many months in a year, while the Yangtze in southern China is notorious for its flood havoc. It was Mao who in 1952 thought of “borrowing some water from the south to the north”. After five decades of research, investigations and planning, the nation has picked up the courage to undertake this mammoth project. There will be three water diversion lines – the eastern, central and western. The 1,150 km “eastern line” will flow along the Grand Canal, China’s ancient man-made water project which began in the year 605, and includes 18 pumping stations and massive dredging from Yangzhou to Beijing region. The 1,200 km “central line” will also run to Beijing-Tianjin region, and would require raising of the dam on the Han river at Danjiangkou reservoir by 13 metres. Water will then flow naturally towards Zhengzhou, where the water will be lifted over the Yellow river and channelled towards Beijing. “The western line is still at a planning stage. The project will require resettlement of about 370,000 people. Shangahi’s Mag-Lev railway line On November 2, 2001 China became the first country in the world to exploit the magnetic levitation technology for a super-high-speed commercial railway line from Pudong airport in Shanghai to the City Centre. The German consortium Transrapid is executing the project to be completed by 2003 at a cost of USD 1.1 billion. Only two other counties – Germany and Japan have used this technology for experimental purposes. Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji and German Chancellor Gerthard Schroeder were present for the kickoff. The project will use powerful magnets to hold the train a few millimetres above the track. The 30-km journey from the airport will be covered in about ten minutes. The magnetic levitation train will be able to reach a speed of 500 km per hour, although it will average about 430 km per hour. The success of this project will pave the way for the 1,300 km connection between Shanghai and Beijing. 

 Letters to the Finance Minister 

  In a pre-budget endeavour to allow various industries to voice their expectations from the Union Budget, CONSTRUCTION WORLD, invited them to write an open letter to the Finance Minister, Yashwant Sinha.

Hon''ble Yashwant Sinha,

Minister for Finance, North Block, Government of India, New Delhi.

 

Ref: Chapter 68 of Excise Duty

 

Your concern and indication to encourage and motivate the construction sector by extending benefits through various budgetary provisions is very much appreciated by one and all. The construction sector is an engine for growth and generates more employment with competitive less capital investments.

 

In this light, we being concerned about the development of the construction sector, request you to consider:

 

“Removal of excise duty on cement concrete blocks (which is 16 per cent) in the ensuring Finance Budget”

 

The main reasons being:

 

It is proved and accepted that C.C. blocks are superior technology compared to bricks (no excise duty). It is also cost effective (if no excise duty), offers ease of construction, less maintenance cost and is more durable.

 

It needs encouragement because it is a budding technology, forming less than five per cent share, giving better benefits. Loading of excise duty has crippled this technology in infancy. Encouragement at this initial stage is necessary and a must for its growth for better benefits at large.

 

It saves the environment because bricks use fertile soil for its manufacture. Basic raw material being cement, it gives a boost to the cement industry which is very necessary.

 

It is a very appropriate and suitable technology for low cost housing and slum rehabilitation projects, giving benefits of less maintenance of cost and loan life.

 

We are confident that due considerations will be given by your ministry.

 

 

Ref: Income tax provision 80-IB for new dates

Your promise to give boost to the construction activity through budgetary provisions is eagerly awaited. In earlier years you had provided in the Income Tax Act provision of 80-IB granting 100 per cent tax exemption for undertakings engaged in development of more than one acre of land and constructing residential units of less than 1,000 sq. ft. subject to certain conditions.

 

We expected in the last budget the same provisions to be continued with extended time limit, but our expectation were not met. In this budget, we request you to provide new dates in 80-IB for approval of plans and completion of the project as 31.03.2003 and 31.03.2006, respectively.

 

This will indeed work as a good motivation for the construction sector.

 

We are sure due consideration will be given by your ministry.

 

 

Ref: Chapter 68 of excise duty

Sub: Clarification for use of fly ash and GGBS in pre-cast concrete products

Your promise to give boost to the construction activity through budgetary provisions is eagerly awaited. As you know pre-cast concrete construction always gives better quality and long life to structures.

 

Further, to boost up the use of industrial waste like fly ash, exemption of excise duty is also given, when fly ash is used in pre-cast concrete production.

 

Unfortunately, such positive thinking while implementing, works out to a big zero. It is mentioned in the provision of excise duty exemption that excise duty is exempted to a concrete article where fly ash is used minimum 25 per cent of concrete. In fact it should be minimum 25 per cent of cement.

 

Firstly, concrete is a mixture of cement, sand and stone chips. Even the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) permit mixing of fly ash in concrete making for partial replacement of cement (not concrete) by fly ash upto 25 per cent. Hence, well-meant exemption to the pre-cast concrete industry is being denied at the implementation level.

 

Secondly, Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) is also industrial waste of the steel industry and also permitted by BIS for partial replacement of cement. Hence, the benefit given to fly ash should also be extended to GGBS. Our request is to simplify the excise duty exemption provisions so that your positive intentions can be interpreted and implemented to give real benefit to the construction activity.

 

We are sure due consideration will be given by your ministry.

 

Narendra D. Patel,

Chairman & Consultant, Indian Concrete Institute (Maharashtra Centre), 43/11, Tamarind Lane,

Rajabahadur Building, Fort, Mumbai – 400001. Tel: (022) 2652655, 2654835 Fax: (022) 2652541

 

 

  Prayer for imposition of “Definitive Dumping Duty” on calcium carbide

 

Calcium carbide is an important ingredient for manufacturing ‘dissolved acetylene’ used by engineering and construction sectors, desulphurisation compound used by steel plants, acetylene black required by dry cell manufacturers, grunide nitrate required by defence installations and agricultural chemicals.

 

Birla Carbide & Gases have established facilities for producing calcium carbide as an ‘import substitute’ at Birlapur in the year 1954. India had sufficient manufacturing capacities to cater to the demand of the above industries for the last five decades. However, liberalisation and opening up of the Indian economy changed the scenario and one after the other, plants producing calcium carbide had to close down. As a consequence of the unrestricted placement of calcium carbide from overseas sources, i.e. China and Romania at prices, which are below the variable cost of production, severe damage has been caused to domestic industry. It is also a matter of grave concern that based on highly subsidised power (from an Indian aided project) and raw material cost, a Bhutanese company is taking full advantage of its low production cost and freely placing its entire production into India at nil custom tariff at the cost of Indian producers.

 

Presently, import of carbide is subject to a nominal “anti dumping duty” of USD 13.88/ MT when imported from China and USD 24.29/MT when imported from Romania. At the present rate of USD, it works out to Rs. 666 & Rs. 1,166 per tonne respectively.

 

If immediate corrective measures are not taken by the government of India, remaining domestic producers e.g. Birla Carbide & Gases & DCM Shriram Consolidated Ltd. will also have to suspend their operations with consequences of loss of capital, labour and employment and this will result in the country being totally on the mercy of Bhutan and other overseas countries for meeting its requirement of a vital material like carbide.

 

Birla Carbide & Gases is making heavy losses since many years due to depressed realisation and continued increase in the power tariff and cost of other raw materials over which it has no control. West Bengal State Electricity Board has increased their “power tariff” again w.e.f. 01.04.2001, which will further aggravate the situation. Therefore, we pray for imposition of Definitive Anti-Dumping Duty, which should be the difference between USD 500 and landed value of imports per tonne from exporters of China and Romania.

 

We humbly submit that carbide from Bhutan should be considered either imports or domestic production and accordingly duties and taxes should be levied.

 

A. K. Dalmiya, Sr. Vice President, Birla Vinoleum, E-Mail: bclbv@vsnl.net

 

 

Some issues for consideration

 

We thank you very much for your letter dated January 16, 2002. In the Budget during the discussion, we would like to take up the following issues.

 

1) No changes in present duty structure till all the Indian Labour Law, Excise Law, Custom Law, etc. are changed, as it prevails in other countries till the stability of the changes already made are seen and evaluated.

2) The industry, which has already suffered a loss due to globalisation, shall be given financial help, banks and financial institution should be clearly advised, wherever the reason for the sickness is the change in duty structure & devaluation) by way of:

a) The interest during the period involved shall be waived off.

b) The amount of loss suffered shall be recovered by way of instalments during the seven years on which interest at lower than PLR should be charged or no interest should be charged.

c) Government should give to industry 20 per cent of the loss suffered or 20 per cent of the total revenue given to government (custom, excise, sales tax, octroi, T.O.T. etc.) during the loss years, as interest free loan or as help.

The government policy (introduction of VAT, lowering of custom duty, devaluation etc.) changes shall be given a real introduction as to how it is going to take place. How it is going to effect the working of different industries, trade and general public shall be foreseen and in all the concerned be informed minimum four to six months in advance.

Precautionary measures shall be taken so that all concerned will be stable and not lose. For example, if devaluation is going to take place, the government should advise and restrict opening LCs on credit. Advise the Indian industry to pay their foreign exchange due in advance, which effects the stability and profitability of the Indian trade and industry. This has happened with us and we had to pay more money, which has affected the whole unit.

Finally, once again as we have already informed through various letters, the laws pertaining to labour needs revolutionary changes otherwise changes made will not meet government expectations. The basic efficiency, productivity and innovation things must be taken into consideration for a better India.

 

P. R. Pomani, Managing Director, Shree Pomani Metals & Alloys Ltd. e-mail: pomani@bom6.vsnl.net.in

 

Real Estate

New FDI norms need alteration

  Most professionals in Mumbai in the realty business expressed concern that the new FDI norms for the real estate sector may not dramatically increase the flow of foreign direct investments after the government allowed 100 per cent FDI in this sector. They said the norms were too stringent and lacked clarity to attract sizeable foreign investment.

  Deepak Parekh, chairman of Housing Development Finance Corporation (HDFC) said from Tokyo that though this was a step in the right direction, the ceiling of a minimum 100-acre land holding by a foreign investor was "just not viable". In a mega city like Mumbai, for instance, there is no such availability of land at a stretch, he said.

"There won’t be any impact on real estate or property prices in the city," said Parekh, and added that more clarity was needed on the guidelines.

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 New FDI guidelines will have no impact: Experts

  "Allowing FDI in real estate is a welcome step but is not likely to have a significant impact until we put our house in order," Anshuman Magazine, managing director of CB Richard Ellis India, said. He said that stamp duties and property taxes need to be clear and there should also be a clear system of owning and transferring land. Once the government ensures these, then a flood of FDI will automatically come to India, he said.

  Another consultant said, "It is like telling an aeroplane to land without having a runway in place." He also pointed out that while the FDI is being allowed, there should not be any restrictions on foreign investors.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 Land pooling system to replace acquisition system

  While fears have been expressed in many quarters that politicians and land mafia will be the ultimate beneficiaries of the new land pooling system proposed in the draft Master Plan 2021, the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) vice-chairman, Prasanna Hota, has said land pooling will ensure that villagers become part of the development process.

  The land pooling system is proposed to replace the traditional land acquisition system in the draft master plan, which will be ready in six weeks time. Under the land acquisition system, approved by the Union Cabinet in 1960, large-scale land was acquired by paying farmers. The development authority used its own discretion in determining land was being developed into green belts and other non-remunerative utilities.

 Delhi in for radical changes

  The capitals cityscape could change dramatically in the near future. Delhi’s rural pockets could vanish; land use is likely to become flexible; and the old city will be redeveloped.

  These are some of the highlights of Master Plan 2021 for Delhi. Lieutenant Governor Vijai Kapoor said that the draft plan would be submitted to the Urban Development Ministry soon.

The move has already become controversial because of its wide-ranging implications. Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit has protested, saying that the elected government hadn’t been consulted in the drafting of the plan.

 IDBI Bank to offer 100% housing loan

  In a unique scheme offer in the housing sector, IDBI Bank in Mumbai has agreed to provide 100 per cent loan on the cost of the flat for the Vasai project of Evershine Builders Pvt. Ltd. As per the tie up, the customer would not be required to make any down payment.

  According to an IDBI Bank official, the bank would explore the possibility of further tie-ups with Evershine Builders in future.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 No buyer for Ashok Delhi

  In spite of its best efforts, the government failed to find a buyer for Ashok Delhi. Only two bidders came forward for the Hotel Corporation of India (HCI) owned Delhi property, but both the bids were rejected since they were lower than the reserve price.

  The India Tourism Development Corporation (ITDC) owned Qutab Hotel, however, was bagged by Sushil Gupta of the Asian Hotels for about Rs. 36 crore.

While the reserve price for Qutab Hotel would be ascertained only after the government opens the reserve price document for all hotels together before the end of January, sources say the highest bid was Rs. 36 crore.

 New FDI guidelines will have no impact: Experts

  "Allowing FDI in real estate is a welcome step but is not likely to have a significant impact until we put our house in order," Anshuman Magazine, managing director of CB Richard Ellis India, said. He said that stamp duties and property taxes need to be clear and there should also be a clear system of owning and transferring land. Once the government ensures these, then a flood of FDI will automatically come to India, he said.

  Another consultant said, "It is like telling an aeroplane to land without having a runway in place." He also pointed out that while the FDI is being allowed, there should not be any restrictions on foreign investors.

 Land pooling system to replace acquisition system

  While fears have been expressed in many quarters that politicians and land mafia will be the ultimate beneficiaries of the new land pooling system proposed in the draft Master Plan 2021, the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) vice-chairman, Prasanna Hota, has said land pooling will ensure that villagers become part of the development process.

  The land pooling system is proposed to replace the traditional land acquisition system in the draft master plan, which will be ready in six weeks time. Under the land acquisition system, approved by the Union Cabinet in 1960, large-scale land was acquired by paying farmers. The development authority used its own discretion in determining land was being developed into green belts and other non-remunerative utilities.

 Land pooling system to replace acquisition system

  While fears have been expressed in many quarters that politicians and land mafia will be the ultimate beneficiaries of the new land pooling system proposed in the draft Master Plan 2021, the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) vice-chairman, Prasanna Hota, has said land pooling will ensure that villagers become part of the development process.

  The land pooling system is proposed to replace the traditional land acquisition system in the draft master plan, which will be ready in six weeks time. Under the land acquisition system, approved by the Union Cabinet in 1960, large-scale land was acquired by paying farmers. The development authority used its own discretion in determining land was being developed into green belts and other non-remunerative utilities.

 Delhi in for radical changes

  The capitals cityscape could change dramatically in the near future. Delhi’s rural pockets could vanish; land use is likely to become flexible; and the old city will be redeveloped.

  These are some of the highlights of Master Plan 2021 for Delhi. Lieutenant Governor Vijai Kapoor said that the draft plan would be submitted to the Urban Development Ministry soon.

The move has already become controversial because of its wide-ranging implications. Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit has protested, saying that the elected government hadn’t been consulted in the drafting of the plan.

 IDBI Bank to offer 100% housing loan

  In a unique scheme offer in the housing sector, IDBI Bank in Mumbai has agreed to provide 100 per cent loan on the cost of the flat for the Vasai project of Evershine Builders Pvt. Ltd. As per the tie up, the customer would not be required to make any down payment.

  According to an IDBI Bank official, the bank would explore the possibility of further tie-ups with Evershine Builders in future.

 No buyer for Ashok Delhi

  In spite of its best efforts, the government failed to find a buyer for Ashok Delhi. Only two bidders came forward for the Hotel Corporation of India (HCI) owned Delhi property, but both the bids were rejected since they were lower than the reserve price.

  The India Tourism Development Corporation (ITDC) owned Qutab Hotel, however, was bagged by Sushil Gupta of the Asian Hotels for about Rs. 36 crore.

While the reserve price for Qutab Hotel would be ascertained only after the government opens the reserve price document for all hotels together before the end of January, sources say the highest bid was Rs. 36 crore.

 

Products

Euro Series Portable Air Compressors

  The new range of Euro Series portable screw air compressors from Chicago Pneumatic Sales, [a division of Atlas Copco [India] Ltd.] are compressors with design innovations and features, including economic power consumption. 

  Its efficient design helps minimise wear, ensuring high reliability and long working life. The Euro compliant, fuel-efficient engine offers best operating economy. It has a new concept of an exhaust chamber with the exhaust directed upwards and its suitably sized heat exchangers ensure low operating temperatures. It has a well-balanced chassis and a sturdy tow bar. The whole unit is extremely stable at high towing speeds, providing faster mobility. The canopy doors open upwards providing easy access to the machine, thus routine maintenance can be performed in less time. The compressors answering all compressed air needs, make them the logical choice for every construction application. They are available in capacities [FAD] ranging from 180-600 cfm. and operating pressures ranging from 7-10.5 bar g.

 Shalideck SL – Self-levelling epoxy flooring

  STP’s unique self-levelling epoxy flooring has revolutionised the flooring needs of a variety of industries. From the automobile to food industry, electronic assemblies to pharmaceuticals, many customers find this flooring extremely attractive.

  his product has been designed at keeping the cost as well as functional requirements in mind, to deliver value for money to the customer. Available in many attractive colours, this 500 microns self-levelling floor gives at least five times more life than epoxy coatings. Designed to withstand foot traffic as well as forklift movement, it is resistant to oil, grease, variety of chemicals etc. It is also a joint-less monolithic floor and is easily cleanable.

 

  The new range of Euro Series portable screw air compressors from Chicago Pneumatic Sales, [a division of Atlas Copco [India] Ltd.] are compressors with design innovations and features, including economic power consumption. 

  

 Duracem – A concrete solution to cracks

  Innovative Products & Systems have introduced Duracem fiber – a revolutionary “new” synthetic material specially developed for the construction industry to overcome the inherent problems associated with cement concrete mixes and to produce a more tough, durable and water resistant concrete product with superior mechanical properties. These synthetic fibers provide additional advantages to cement concrete mix specifiers by being rustproof, chemically inert, acid and alkali resistant, non-magnetic and overall safe and simple to use. 

  When added to the cement concrete mix, Duracem fibers combine with the cement, fine and coarse aggregates, water and additives producing a strong mechanical binding action. In addition, Duracem fibers also save on direct and indirect construction and repair costs. Some of the advantages, are that it controls shrinkage cracking, reduces settlement cracks, reduces water and chemical penetration, improves impact, shatter and abrasion resistance etc. 

 

  Computer Based Solutions Pvt. Ltd. has launched the TECHeBOOK on Cement & Concrete, a new software tool that gives quick and accurate concrete mix design, under the company’s digiCat banner.

 

This software has an easy-to-use single form in which, the user selects parameters and fills in ingredient data. The entire process takes just a few minutes and an accurate mix design suited for the selected field conditions is ready. The resulting mix design can be saved and retrieved and also be instantly analysed for cost, based on the costs and relative composition of the ingredient set.

 

  

 Emergency lighting with safety

  Emergency lighting is required in most public buildings, hospitals, factories and hotels to ensure that exit and escape paths are illuminated in the event of mains power failure. PROLITE has now introduced an exhaustive range of fire exit and exit, guide lights, safety lights and community signs to ensure orderly and peaceful dispersal of crowds from public places. This is available in three levels of safety - mains operated, battery operated and AUTOGLO modes.

 

Autoglo is a photoluminescent material, which emits a clear and visible glow when there is power failure or total darkness. This material requires no battery-power or any other triggering source for emission of the glow. In view of this, it is hundred per cent safe and does not involve heat, flame, electric shock or pollution. On exposure to light, natural or artificial, it absorbs and stores light energy and then in the absence of light, this captivated light is released to give off a luminous glow by its non-toxic chemical.

 

  It requires no external or internal wiring or electric supply. It is waterproof, explosion-proof, corrosion-proof, mold-proof, vapour proof and fire retardant (in case of metal signs). The signs, made and designed as per international standards, have long life and are maintenance free. 

 

Interiors

Moksha , In House Salvation

  Moksha , the wellness place, as it is called, addresses the mind, body and soul and positions itself as more than just a gymnasium. Situated in the heart of Breach Candy, this 10,000 sq. ft. gymnasium- a Pritish Nandy Communications Ltd's venture - is as creative and flamboyant as the man himself, as FALGUNI PADODE finds out.

 

  Housed on the ground floor in a charming, old bungalow opposite the American Consulate, Moksha, shares its place in the sun with Sachin Tendulkar’s in-laws who live on the floor above.

 

 

A driveway leads you to the ground plus mezzanine structure. Arched glass windows with a natural wood glass door beckon inwards. Moksha – it is not a gym – claims to be a lifestyle. Elton Menezes, manager, the man who has been working on the project since its inception says, “We take our bodies for granted. Moksha is about pampering yourself with the best.” Affiliated to the IHRSA(International Health Resorts and Spa Association), it offers its members, access to 3,500 outlets worldwide.

 

The designing and detailing of the gym have been done in-house by Pritish himself and supervised by his team led by manager Elton. Every aspect of the gym has been carefully designed and minutely supervised.

 

Aimed at the corporate crowd and glamour world, Moksha offers a complete lifestyle. A gymnasium, cardio theatre, free-weights section, café and lounge bar, beauty salon and oxygen bar are imbued with an Indianness with names like Shanti (relaxation), Shingar (beauty), Hasya (enjoyment) and Veer (for vigour and strength).

 

The reception at the entrance immediately opens out into the gym area, which is 16 ft. in height and is segregated into the gymnasium, free weights section and the cardio-vascular theatre. The flooring is wooden which is cushioned (12mm) and laminated, the upholstery is yellow, and the equipment in the gym is from Cybex. On either side of the gym arched doorways lead to the cardio theatre (increases your heart rate!) and the free weights section. According to Elton, “These have been sectioned so that people don’t get in each others way.” Directly visible from the gym is the oxygen bar upstairs – O2.

 

“Life is so hectic, all stressed out executives need to relax. Treat yourself to some pure air,” grins Elton.

 

Seated in recliner massage chairs from Dyna, you can treat yourself to six flavours of oxygen, which rejuvenates the system at just Rs. 250. Soft music and a blue halogen aids the ‘Shanti’ aura. A 12 mm toughened glass, screens out all the noise, while allowing you to look down at those sweating it out below.

 

The gym leads on to the café and lounge bar, multi-activity studio and the spa. A bright red backlit floor strip leads the way inside. The purpose of the strip? “To lend some colour to the place,” says Elton,simply.A corridor opens out into a quadrangle flanked on the side with the café and the lounge bar. The quadrangle has a Vergola roof with slats that open up, to let the outdoors in. The café has a flat screen TV and the area aims to serve as a meeting place to chill, apart from serving some truly exciting fusion cuisine.

 

On one side of the corridor is the multi-activity studio. With brilliant aquamarine Italian Taraflex tiles, it has suspended wooden flooring underneath to absorb impact. The bench and weights are all state-of-the-art, while all the walls are mirrored. Pulsating music pours out of a Nakamichi music system.

 

On the way to the studio are the gents and ladies spa. The men’s spa consists of lockers, changing room, showers, three therapy rooms, a standing jacuzzi, chilled shower unit, steam unit and exotic baths. Deep sea blue Bisazza tiles all over the spa give it a distinct Mediterranean feel. The tubs have also been tiled. The women’s spa is similarly designed with burnt orange tiles.Exotic massages and herbal baths add to the total experience. An in house nutritionist and a beauty salon upstairs, complete the whole experience at Moksha.

 

No expense has been spared in creating a world class environment. Enthusiastically designed to create a lifestyle , where members can work out, destress, relax, enjoy and rejuvenate themselves, Moksha endeavours to promise more than just a beautiful body.

 

 

Contact:

Elton Menezes,

Moksha

Tel: 3676990/3610221.

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 MSRDC

  Certain work ethics have been set within the MSRDC, which has a history of completing several huge projects on time and some even before schedule.

Vikram Singh Patankar, Minister of State for Public Works and Chairman, MSRDC.

 

  Several new infrastructural projects, state-of-the-art and futuristic, worth over 22,000 crore, presently undertaken by the Maharashtra State Road Development Corporation will change the face of Maharashtra state, believes Vikram Singh Patankar, Minister of State for Public Works and Chairman, MSRDC. Excerpts from an interview with Construction World.

 

MSRDC was initially concerned with the task of upgrading intercity roads and highways, but has now undertaken the tasks of developing new airports, waterways as well as the Rapid Transit Rail System.

 

Yes, the role played by MSRDC earlier was limited to road development, but has now expanded in view of the need to develop a comprehensive transport and communication network in a cohesive and coordinated fashion.

 

 

Are you satisfied with the rate at which different projects are progressing?

 

Projects of infrastructural nature do take a long time to take off as they involve viability studies, clearance from environment and other authorities. However, certain work ethics have been set within the MSRDC, which has a history of completing several huge projects on time and some even before schedule and within the budget.

 

 

What is the current status of the Bandra-Worli Sea-Link?

 

Work on the Bandra-Worli Sea-Link has been divided into four packages. The first is the construction of a flyover over Lovegrove Junction at Worli, the second is the construction of the cloverleaf interchange at Mahim intersection and the third package is the construction of solid approach road from the Mahim intersection up to the start of the Toll Plaza, on the Bandra side and a public promenade. Work on these three packages has already begun. The project design of the last and the most crucial package, that of constructing a cable-stayed bridge together with via-duct approaches extending from the Khan Abdul Gaffar Khan road upto the Toll Plaza, Intelligent Bridge System (IBS), improvements to the existing KAGK road and ancillary structures, is complete.  However, work on this last phase has yet to commence as bids received for package four are being evaluated for award of work.

 

 

What kind of technology works in terms of high quality and low costs?

 

All these projects are undertaken based on advice from highly qualified consultants from abroad, a large number of highly qualified Indian executives, several risk analysis studies and cost feasibility studies. And the final decision always attempts to optimise the design, mainly keeping in mind the concerns related to utility, durability, safety aesthetics and costs. However, MSRDC has been keen to emphasise new technology. Like, for example, IBS - ‘Intelligent Bridge System’, the first of its kind in India, will be equipped with an intelligent toll plaza where passengers have a choice to opt for a fully automatic system which allows passage without stopping. Or passengers can choose a semi-automatic system stop, while others can opt for the conventional toll plaza, which requires to stop and pay cash. The IBS comprised of fibre optic cable housed in PVC running parallel to the Bandra-Worli corridor, will have a Control Centre, which will provide traffic information, surveillance, monitoring systems, remote weather information systems and emergency telephones.

 

 

 

There is much criticism regarding the servicing of by-lane traffic, which obstructs the smooth flow of main road traffic, as well as delay in completion of the Mohammed Ali Road flyover. The servicing of by-lane traffic needs attention and every effort is being made to coordinate the work of MSRDC with the concerned local municipal corporations and the R.T.A. as well and yet there are some problems. Efforts to complete the Mohammed Ali Road Flyover as soon as possible are being made.

 

 

Has MSRDC been responsive to the ‘reactions’ of the ‘project affected persons’?

 

Every time a large project is undertaken there are bound to be ‘project affected persons’. However, MSRDC has successfully rehabilitated all project-affected persons who have been dishoused, while others who object to projects due to some or the other vested interest have to be side-lined in view of a wider public interest.

 

 

MSRDC's ongoing projects: 50 projects, (Mumbai Traffic Improvement mega project); Airoli bridge project; Amravati Integrated Road Development Project, Aurangabad city Integrated Road Development Project; Bandra-Worli Sea Link Project; Four-laning of Satara-Kolhapur-Kagal NH4 (As part of golden quadrangle of NHAI); Improvements to Satara Chalkewadi Patan road; Mumbai-Aurangabad-Nagpur Highway Development to NH standards; Mumbai-Pune Expressway and Panvel by-pass; Nagpur city Integrated Road Development Programme; Pune Integrated Road Development project; Railway Over-bridges projects; Solapur Integrated Road Development Project.

Projects in the pipeline: Light Rail Transit (LRT) for Pune and Nagpur; Multi-modal International Hub Airport at Nagpur; Mumbai Trans-Harbour Link (Nhava-Sewri Sea Link Project); Mass Rapid Transit System for Thane city; Nanded City Integrated Road Development Project; Nandurbar Integrated Road Development Project; Construction of jetties on Western free waterlink between Goregaon and Nariman Point.